Trudy Triumph's Neurogenic Bladder Blog

Pregnancy and Neurogenic Bladder

Question:
Hi Trudy!
I am 30 years old and been diagnosed with a neurogenic bladder from the age of 9 due to spinal cord surgery that went wrong. Ever since I have been using self catheterization between 5-15 times a day. Went to school, got my degree and worked a full time job. It’s been a struggle (also mentally) but I’ve been coping with it.
Today I am 25 weeks pregnant for the first time, and having a neurogenic bladder has added a lot of stress to my pregnancy, to a point where even though I’ve been dealing with this issue most of my life, I’ve found myself lost and very much alone.

How does one deal with pregnancy and self catheterization? What happens when I get too big to do it myself? Will the contractions make me loose bladder control like other pain does?

I never found another woman dealing with these issues until I found your blog, but I couldn’t find anything about pregnancy.

Would very much appreciate your thoughts and advice.

I apologize for my bad grammar and spelling, English is not my native tongue.

Thank you!
-S

Trudy”s Answer:

Early in pregnancy feeling hopeful.

How big can you get??

Congratulations, I am truly happy for you.  What a blessing children are.  I found this video that you might enjoy, as your child grows and your excitement builds.

As you might know I am not a medical person. I do however have some thoughts that might help.  I do have neurogenic bladder like you and I was also pregnant for the first time as well. I birthed a 10 pounder for my first child and the good thing about that is that my daughter grew gradually. My bladder got more compressed, smashed really. Each day seemed a little like the day before. I learned to cope because the process was gradual.

Our doctors are not sympathetic to our daily lives.  Honestly I think they could care less, but I promise you that as soon as a medical emergency pops up your doctor will help you solve the problem. That is what they do best.

As time goes on you might need to find a new cathing position or a longer intermittent catheter, all an easy fix.

As you enjoy this very special time in your life remember not to let your chronic condition rob you of your joy. Life is full of these hurtles.  Run a good race.

I understand the mind games that we put ourselves through. Just recently I was given the opportunity to travel to China with a group from my church.

To give you a background about myself, for years I suffered with back to back bladder-infections due to using  intermittent catheter.  For the last several years, I was fortunate enough to be bladder infection free due to a low dose antibiotic taken daily, preventatively.

Well wouldn’t you know the day I was going to sign on the dotted line to go to China I broke through and got the dreaded bladder infection.

With the doctors help, I am well again but believe me, I spent a bit of time with a HUGE pity party. “WHY ME??” “I am so tired of this crap”

At that time I had a choice, was I going to let this chronic condition rob me of the good parts of my life?  Believe me, I have learned when it gets embarrassing, keep on, keeping on.  When it hurts, keep busy and try not to think about it.

I told my husband, get travel insurance. I will go to China!.

We need to live, run a good race.  No it is not easy at times.  Our life is a bit more complicated. You will be a great mom.

I hope this helps you. Please write to me and let me know how it is going.

Does anyone out there have words of wisdom to share?

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