Trudy Triumph's Neurogenic Bladder Blog

Is Surgery the Answer for Bladder Incontinence?

There is a lot of flip-flap about doing a surgical procedure to “cure” paralyzed parts (nerve connections) to help people urinate and poo on their own.  In some cases many small electrodes are put into the body near the targeted nerves. 

I have some questions about this procedure;

  • Exactly how long is this procedure meant to last, before the small wires drift out of place?
  • If it does not work, how hard is it to remove the hardwear?
  • After the product is sold, where is the support system?  
  • Who picks up the pieces ?
  • (Is there a bonus for the doctors who treat the broken?)
  • Once a nerve is subjected to the trauma of surgery and the further irritation of electrical stimulation will it calm down or will it bother me for the rest of my life?

I have been asked from readers and Facebook friends how I feel about this specific operation, a "Cure".  I can only answer for myself but for me it is too soon.  I am reminded of the mesh surgeries that are in litigation as I write.  

Just take time to consider the failure of the case of the Vaginal Sling;

 Learn about lawsuits with a Transvaginal Mesh

  • Infection
  • Pain and discomfort
  • Urinary and bladder problems
  • Recurrence of prolapse / incontinence
  • Bowel, bladder and blood vessel perforation during insertion
  • Vaginal scarring
  • Dyspareunia (pain during sex)

These symptoms are caused by shrinkage and erosion.  I am not a medical doctor but I know my body moves and foreign parts can move, drift from the intended place.  In the beginning of this post I stated that one of my big questions is, "How long is the procedure intended to last?"  The device is not put in with concrete and rebar; they are not even connected to a bone, but put in a living moving body.  How are they stablized?

Because of my condition I get back to back bladder infections.  Sometimes I get so tired and I hurt so much.  The thought of being able to use the toilet normally is so intriguing. The thought of re-acquiring normal function gives me hope but after reading a lot of what others have to say, it is not quite right, for me …yet…maybe someday…

I know I have written about this before: like a lot of you, I am not sure what my future holds in the realm of toileting.  Right now I use an intermittent catheter and it is safe and easy to use.  but what if my back goes out big time and I can not bend to reach to use my catheter? Will I be tempted towards surgery….? Sure I would, because what choice would I have?  My thought is to hold off on surgical measures until I am no longer able to use an intermittent catheter.  I will be honest with you and confess that I canceled a summer vacation when I first considered this surgery.  After much reading what others had to say,  I decided it was not for me; not now.

If you are interested in reading a discussion of women patients that have tried this procedure, please take a look at this discussion on the Inspire  website  A website I frequent  for people with health concerns.

Inspire discussion of Interstem

DISCLAIMER: The contents of this blog are for support, encouragement & informational purposes only and do not replace advice from health care professionals.

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